Year 8 Subject Progress Grids - AP1

Art

Band A

Band B

Band C

Competent and consistent critical understanding of the work of the cubist Art movement. Basic ability to select and experiment with media, materials, techniques and processes appropriate to personal intentions.

  • Competent analysis of the work of the cubists, use of keywords.

  • Figurative drawings completed with consistent proportions to the human figure. 

  • Completion of a 3D Clay sculpture, with a resemblance to a Figurative image in the style of Henry Moore.

Emerging and competent critical understanding of the work of the cubist Art movement. Limited and basic ability to select and experiment with media, materials, techniques and processes appropriate to personal intentions.

  • Emerging and competent analysis of the work of the cubists, some use of keywords possibly.

  • Figurative drawings completed with inconsistent proportions. 

  • Completion of a 3D Clay sculpture, with some resemblance to a Figurative image.

Basic critical understanding of the work of the cubist Art movement.  Limited ability to select and experiment with media, materials, techniques and processes appropriate to personal intentions.

  • Basic analysis of the work of the cubists, with no keywords used.

  • Figurative drawings completed with incorrect proportions.

  • Completion of a 3D  Clay sculpture, loosely resembling a figurative image.

 

 

Dance

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Demonstrate some development of performance and interpretative skills for performance during the rehearsal process.

  • Demonstrate some application of technical, stylistic and interpretative skills during performance.

  • Identify own application of skills and techniques with the use of some examples and key terminology.

Students can:

  • Attempt to demonstrate performance and interpretative skills during the rehearsal process.

  • Apply some technical skills during rehearsal and performance.

  • Identify own development of skills and techniques with the use of some examples.

Students can:

  • Copy performance and interpretative skills for performance during the rehearsal process.

  • Copy limited technical skills during rehearsal and performance.

  • Name some skills and techniques with the use of limited examples.

 

Drama

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Frequently demonstrate insight and sensitivity in working in a group to produce a performance.

  •  Demonstrate a mostly secure awareness of the relationship between texts and dramatic styles and of social context and genre, creating, exploring and developing ideas appropriately.

  • Apply and adapt a range of practical skills well.

  •  Perform a role with reasonable creativity and originality to communicate ideas. This is consistent in performance.

  • Display secure communication and reflective skills.

  •  Show a good understanding of drama terminology and use it accurately and appropriately.

  • Show critical awareness of work in progress in terms of design, own contribution and that of others.

  • Show awareness of audience, work well in the group and respond to the leadership of others as well as contributing to their work.

Students can:

  • Demonstrate some insight and sensitivity in working in a group to produce a performance.

  • Demonstrate an awareness of the relationship between texts and dramatic styles and of social context and genre.

  •  Can apply and adapt a reasonable range of practical skills.

  • Can perform a role with some creativity and originality to communicate ideas. This is consistent in performance.

  • Display developing communication and reflective skills.

  • Show an understanding of drama terminology and use it mostly accurately and appropriately.

  • Show some critical awareness of work in progress in terms of design,  own contribution and that of others.

  • Show some awareness of audience and work well in the group and respond to the leadership of others.

 

 

Students can:

  • Demonstrate some limited insight and sensitivity in working in a group to produce a performance.

  • Demonstrate some limited awareness of the relationship between texts and dramatic styles and of social context and genre.

  • Apply a limited range of practical skills to some effect.

  •  Perform a simple role to communicate my ideas, sometimes effectively.

  • Display some basic communication and reflective skills.

  • Show some limited understanding of drama terminology and use it with some accuracy.

  • Show some limited awareness of their own work and contribution and that of others.  Can make some critical analysis.

  •  Show some limited awareness of audience and provide some limited support to the group.

 

 

English

Band A

Band B

Band C

Reading 
Reading
Reading

Students can:

  •  Summarise and evaluate the Sherlock Holmes texts studied  with accuracy and sustained understanding.

  • Understand and make detailed responses to the  explicit and implicit meanings and viewpoints within Arthur Conan Doyle’s writing.

  • Analyse and evaluate various aspects of Arthur Conan Doyle’s language, grammar and structure.

Support their personal response with precise embedded references to texts and the context of the era in which Sherlock Holmes was written.

Students can:

  • Confidently describe and summarise the Sherlock Holmes texts studied with accuracy and clear understanding.

  • Respond with increasing detail to most explicit and some implicit information and viewpoints  within Arthur Conan Doyle’s writing.

  • Make relevant comments about the  language and structure that Arthur Conan Doyle employs.

  • Support their comments and opinions with quotations from the text with some reference to the era in which Sherlock Holmes was written.

 

Students can:

  • Make some straightforward points about the Sherlock Holmes extracts studied using some limited detail. 

  • Spot words in a Sherlock Holmes extract  in response to questions and make some attempt to explain their effect.

  • Develop a limited personal response to the character of Sherlock Holmes.

 

Writing
writing
writing

 Students can:

  • Communicate with increasing confidence and clarity the plot and characters of their detective story.

  • Produce an engaging, developed detective story with conscious shape and cohesion.

  • Use a variety of sentence types and structures and increasingly sophisticated vocabulary that is selected for effect. They will be able to draw on the style used by Arthur Conan Doyle.

  • Spell, punctuate and use grammar accurately, with few errors.

 

 Students can:

  •  Communicate ideas with increasing success to produce a clear detective story.

  • Produce a detective story with structural features and increasing awareness of purpose 

  • Show control over sentence type and structure and use some sophisticated vocabulary to some effect 

  • Spell, punctuate and use grammar with increased accuracy.

Students can:

  • Communicate with some increased detail. 

  • Outline the plot and characters of their detective story.

  • Attempt to use  some increased structural features within their detective stories

  • Try to use a range of sentence types with some simple vocabulary 

  • Make some increased attempt to spell accurately and punctuate writing.

 

Enterprise

Band A

Band B

Band C

In addition to the requirements for Band B and C, students can:

  • Understand the future of money Bitcoins. 

  • Understand the importance of casting their vote. 

  • Demonstrate developing financial life skills like cash management. 

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the minimum wage and importance of National Insurance. 

  • Show awareness of the world around them. 

  • Consider the training required in order to develop the best customer service skills and the consequences of bad customer service.

In addition to the requirements for Band C, students can:

  • Understand the rights of a citizen.

  • Distinguish between income and savings.

  • Demonstrate developing financial life skills. 

  • Display more confidence and aspiration to develop their existing talents and strengths. 

  • Understand the impact of government policies on personal finance. 

  • Understand the role of Bank of England on interest rates. 

  • Distinguish between recession and growth. 

  • Understand the importance of Market research to an enterprise. 

  • Understand the importance of customer services.

Students can:

  • Understand what a citizen is. 

  • Explain what money is and its importance. 

  • Attempt to distinguish between income and savings (Attempted assignment). 

  • Understand financial life skills. 

  • Identify types of Market research (Primary and Secondary).

  • Distinguish between goods and services. 

  • Make informed decision and work as part of a team. 

  • Display developing self-awareness and capability.

 

 

Ethics

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  •  Can analyse and draw comparisons between the meaning behind Jewish and Buddhist ways of life.

  • Reflect on their own religious responses in comparison to the beliefs of Judaism and Buddhism.

  • Evaluate how the Ten Commandments and the Wheel of Dharma impact upon every day decisions.

Students can:

  • Explain the meaning behind both Jewish and Buddhist ways of life.

  • Evaluate their own religious responses in comparison to the beliefs of Judaism and Buddhism.

  • Compare the forms of expression from Judaism and Buddhism.

 

Students can:

  •  Describe the meaning behind both Jewish and Buddhist ways of life. 

  • Identify some similarities and differences between Judaism and Buddhism.

  • Consider their own religious ideas in comparison to the beliefs of Judaism, or Buddhism.

 

 

Food and nutrition

Band A

Band B

Band C

Production of dishes
Production of dishes
Production of dishes

Students can:

  • Confidently and independently  follow recipes and confidently demonstrate cooking skills.

  • Seek clarification on occasion.

  • Demonstrate how to work safely and hygienically, using and storing utensils and equipment safely, hygienically and  independently. 

  • Confidently identify a wide range of cooking equipment and utensils and describe their use.

  • Correct problems with dishes independently before seeking teacher advice. Apply advice to correct issues and learn from feedback and experience. 

  • Give guidance to peers to support them. 

  • Create edible products in the time showing accuracy and consideration to flavour by modifying the recipe. The texture and appearance of dishes is appealing.

Students can:

  • Follow recipes independently and 

  • demonstrate cooking skills. 

  • Seek occasional guidance to clear up any misconceptions and clarify ideas rather than ask for help. 

  • Demonstrate how to work safely and hygienically, using and storing utensils and equipment safely, hygienically and independently.  

  • Confidently identify a range of cooking equipment and utensils and describe their use

  • Try to correct problems with dishes before seeking teacher advice. Use advice to correct issues and learn from teacher feedback and experience. 

  • Create edible products in the time and showing accuracy.  Dishes are presentable with suitable textures.

Students can:

  • Read and follow recipes with occasional  teacher assistance / modelling and demonstrate preparation and cooking skills with some pointers.

  • Demonstrate how to work safely and hygienically, using and storing utensils and equipment safely and hygienically with the odd reminder. 

  • Identify a range of cooking equipment and utensils and describe their use.

  • Gain teacher guidance and advice to help correct problems in making on occasion.  Overcome problems with independence and learn from feedback and experience. 

  • Create edible products in the time showing some accuracy with my skills, appealing appearance and suitable textures.

 

Reasoning and Evaluation
Reasoning and Evaluation
Reasoning and Evaluation

Students can:

  • Give valid reasons for choosing dishes in terms of flavour, texture, appearance, health value, cost and skill level.

  • Describe in detail what was successful and unsuccessful about a dish in terms of some of the senses (taste, texture, appearance and smell. 

  • Comment on working practice and consider how a product can be developed if it were to be made again to ensure it is appealing to others. Valid ideas given.

Students can:

  • Give some valid reasons for a chosen dish in terms of flavour, texture, appearance, health value, cost and skill level. 

  • Describe what was successful and unsuccessful about a dish in terms of some of the senses (taste, texture, appearance and smell. 

  • Comment on my working practice and consider how a product could be improved if it were to be made again. Ideas are realistic.

Students can:

  • Give some reasons for a chosen dish in terms of flavour, texture, appearance, health value, cost and skill level. 

  • State what was successful and unsuccessful about my dish. 

  • Comment on working practice and consider how a product could be improved if it were to be made again. Some ideas may be vague or superficial.

 

Geography

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Select and make use of a range of development indicators in order to analyse levels of development.

  • Accurately describe the global distribution of wealth and contrast this with existing models (e.g. ‘The Brandt Line’).

  • Critically evaluate development indicators (e.g. GDP and HDI).

  • Describe and explain the correlation between indicators of development (e.g. GDP and Life Expectancy).

  • Explain how a range of social, economic and environmental factors have contributed to the Development Gap and assess the relative significance of these factors for a country’s development.

  • Demonstrate a secure understanding of the features of sustainable development.

  • Critically evaluate the role of aid projects and Multi-National Corporations in a country’s development.  

  • Use a comprehensive range of geographical terminology confidently.

  • Make use of a range of sources and data to inform and justify conclusions about development issues.

Students can:

  • Make use of development indicators to compare levels of development.

  • Accurately describe the global distribution of wealth, drawing on understanding of existing models (e.g. ‘The Brandt Line’).

  • Outline some advantages and disadvantages of development indicators (e.g. GDP and HDI).

  • Describe and begin to explain the correlation between indicators of development (e.g. GDP and Life Expectancy).

  • Explain how social, economic and environmental factors have contributed to the Development Gap and begin to assess the significance of these for a country’s development.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the features of sustainable development.

  • Explain how aid projects and Multi-National Corporations can help a country to develop, outlining potential advantages and disadvantages.

  • Use a range of appropriate geographical terminology with increasing frequency and accuracy.

  • Make use of a range of sources and data to inform and begin to support conclusions about development issues.

Students can:

  • Make use of development indicators to identify similarities/differences in levels of development.

  • Describe the global distribution of wealth with some accuracy.

  • Identify basic advantages/disadvantages of using some development indicators (e.g. GDP).

  • Outline how human/physical factors have made some countries more developed than others.

  • Explain how aid projects and Multi-National corporations can help a country to develop.

  • Use geographical terminology appropriately.

  • Make use of sources and data to inform conclusions about development issues.

 

 

History

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Write a well structured and comprehensive essay covering all of the causes of an event and evaluates the significance of different causes/consequences.

  • Use PEE paragraphs confidently and can justify my conclusion for each point made.

  • Use a comprehensive range of historical terminology confidently.

  • Make a judgement on the usefulness of the source given.

  • Make developed comments on the content and provenance.

  • Apply contextual knowledge when using sources.

 

Students can:

  • Write detailed paragraphs which detail fully what was it like in the time period.

  • Use a range of appropriate historical terminology with increasing frequency and accuracy (e.g. Industrial Revolution, abolition, infrastructure, Slave Trade) 

  • Explain how different events can have different consequences ( e.g. can explain that urbanisation has positive and negative consequences).

  • Explain the relationship between different causes and their different consequences (Eg: can explain how improvement in industry can improve living conditions)

  • Make a simple evaluation of a source based on provenance.

  • Demonstrate comprehension of source material.

  • Demonstrate limited contextual knowledge when using sources.

Students can:

  • Describe a historical event with some chronological detail and development.

  • Use appropriate historical terminology (e.g. Industrial Revolution, change, abolition, Slave Trade).

  • Briefly explain how an event led to changes in history (e.g. Can explain what were the consequences of the Industrial Revolution and Slave Trade and can identify what was a positive and what was a negative change).

  • Explain at least one cause and consequence of a historical event (e.g what started the Industrial Revolution and Slave Trade)  which cause was the most important.

  • Make simple comments about the content of the source which begin to focus on the question.

  • Make generalised comments on  the provenance of the source.

 

 

Languages

Band A

Band B

Band C

French 
French 
french

Students can:

  • Demonstrate understanding and use of 2 time frames (present and future) with opinions and reasons in longer texts. 

  • Ask some questions.  

  • Translate longer sentences/a short paragraph into and from the Target Language with some errors.

Students can:

  •  Demonstrate understanding and use of the present tense with basic opinions and reasons in short passages.  

  • They can translate 1-tense sentences/into and from the Target Language with reasonable accuracy, although verbs in particular may show errors.

 

Students can:

  •  Demonstrate understanding of main points and opinions in short texts using common present tense verbs. 

  • Translate words and short phrases into English and write short phrases and simple opinions in French, clearly enough to be understood.

 

Spanish 
Spanish 
Spanish 

Students can:

  •  Attain high scores on SSC vocab tests (English to Target Language).  

  • Demonstrate understanding of opinions and reasons in Reading Comprehension.  

  • Translate very short passages accurately from the Target Language.  

  • Write a short paragraph fairly accurately in Target Language  expressing clear opinions with simple reasons.

 Students can:

  •  Attain high scores on SC vocab tests ( half Target Language to  English & half English to Target Language).

  • Demonstrate understanding of opinions and main points in Reading Comprehension.

  • Translate words and short phrases accurately from the Target Language.

  • Write a few short sentences/phrases in Target Language which express simply opinions clearly, if not totally accurately.

 Students can:

  •  Attain high scores on Challenge vocab tests (Target Language to English).

  • Demonstrate understanding of opinions, familiar words, and some short phrases in Reading Comprehension. 

  •  They will be able to match sound to print.

  • They can write some words in Target Language from memory and complete short sentences. Spellings may not be totally accurate.

 

Maths

Band A

Band B

Band C

In addition to the requirements for Band B and C, students can:

  • Understand the difference between a prime number and composite number.

  • Use prime factorisation to solve problems with highest common factor and lowest common multiple.

  • Solve problems involving standard form.

  • Solve problems with standard form using a scientific calculator.

  • Subtract a negative number from any number.

  • Divide a negative number by another negative number.

  • Use Cube numbers both positive and negative.

  • Use a scientific calculator with fractions.

  • Understand the order of operations (BIDMAS) including the square roots.

  • Find the centre of enlargement and the scale factor.

  • Solve problems on scaled diagrams and maps.

  • Interpret plans and elevations, and draw a 3-D shape from them with correct dimensions (both annotated or to scale).

  • Solve contextualised problems with bearings.

  • Solve geometric problems with bearings.

 

In addition to the requirements for Band C, students can:

  • Write any Integer <1000 as a product of prime numbers.

  • Use prime factorising to find the highest common factor and lowest common multiple of two numbers.

  • Round any numbers to any given number of significant figures.

  • Use standard form to write small and large numbers.

  • Explore ways to enter standard form on a scientific calculator.

  • Subtract a positive number from a negative number.

  • Add a negative number to any number.

  • Multiply two negative numbers together.

  • Divide a negative integer by a positive integer.

  • Square positive and negative integers.

  • Understand the order of operations including powers (BIDMAS). 

  • Understand and use a centre of enlargement.

  • Use the concept of scale in diagrams.

  • Draw the plans and elevations of more complicated compound shapes.

  • Use the correct notation for bearings and calculate with them using correct scales.

 

Students can: 

  • Find the prime factors of a number.

  • Round any numbers to 2 significant figures.

  • Subtract a large positive integer from a smaller positive integer.

  • Add a positive number to a negative number.

  • Multiply a positive number with a negative number.

  • Divide a positive integer by a negative integer.

  • Use a scientific calculator to calculate with negative numbers.

  • Enlarge a shape by a positive integer scale factor.

  • Understand what the scale means on maps and diagrams.

  • Know the plans and elevations for 2-D drawings.

  • Understand bearings and be able to measure them.

 

Music

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Play all of the right hand part of Fur Elise, and are beginning to add the left hand too.

  • Identify treble clef notes on the stave.

  • Describe how the elements of music are used to create different moods when listening.

 

Students can:

  • Play the opening three phases of Fur Elise.

  • Identify all the white and black notes on the piano, and are beginning to read notation with support.

  • Can identify all of the musical elements from listening.

 

Students can:

  • Play the opening notes of Fur Elise using just the right hand.

  • Identify all the white notes on the piano.

  • Describe the dynamics (volume) and tempo (speed) of music from listening.

 

PCE

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Evaluate the characteristics of good and safe decision making.

  • Demonstrate good knowledge that allows enables informed decisions about own and others’ risk taking choices.

  • Confidently advise others with their risk taking choices and decision making.

  • Always demonstrate positive social skills, taking into account personal circumstances when considering others' choices.

  • Work very well as part of a team and demonstrate leadership qualities, often influencing others in a positive way.

Students can:

  • Explain the characteristics of good and safe decision making.

  • Demonstrate good knowledge that allows enables informed decisions about own risk taking choices.

  • Sometimes advise others with their risk taking choices and decision making.

  • Demonstrate positive social skills which allows an understanding other people’s choices.

  • Work well as part of a team, often influencing others in a positive way.

Students can:

  • Describe the characteristics of good and safe decision making.

  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge that enables informed decisions about own risk taking choices.

  • Mostly demonstrate positive social skills, allowing some understanding of other people’s decision making.

  • Work well as part of a team, sometimes influencing others in a positive way.

 

PE

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Give a detailed definition of the fitness components and confidently link to a variety of  relevant sporting examples. 

  • Explain the relevance of fitness testing and its importance for improving performance across a variety of sports.

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge of how to conduct fitness tests accurately and be able to identify strengths and weaknesses in their own and others’ performance. 

  • Confidently lead others through the performance of each fitness test.

  • Describe and conduct the relevant training methods for the fitness component and make clear links to practical examples.

  • Compare their current fitness levels to others in the class and identify areas to improve their own and others’ performance.

  • Justify giving clear examples of why an increase in fitness will improve their own and teams performances across a variety of sports.

Students can:

  • Give a detailed definition of the fitness components and give a link to a relevant sporting examples. 

  • Explain the relevance of fitness testing and its importance for improving performance.

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge of how to conduct fitness tests accurately and be able to identify strengths and weaknesses in their own and others’ performance.

  • Describe and conduct the relevant training methods for the fitness component and make clear links to practical examples.

  • Compare their current fitness levels to others in the class and identify areas to improve their own and others’ performance.

 

Students can:

  • Give a basic definition of the fitness components and give a link to a relevant sporting example.  

  • Describe the relevance of fitness testing and its importance for improving performance.

  • Demonstrate a reasonable knowledge of how to conduct fitness tests accurately and be able to identify strengths and weaknesses in performance.

  • Identify the relevant training methods for the fitness component and make some links to practical examples.

  • Give a basic comparison of their current fitness levels to others in the class.

 

 

Science

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Explain the processes of digestion and absorption.

  • Explain how damaged alveoli result in less gas exchange.

  • Interpret formulae relating to the structure of compounds.

  • Use the particle model when explaining the particular arrangement of different substances.

  • Describe patterns in data, making predictions about molecules.

  • Explain how an image is formed using lenses.

  • Use accurate scientific terminology confidently.

  • Critically evaluate and refine methodologies, and judge the validity of scientific conclusions.

  • Critically analyse qualitative and quantitative data to draw logical, well- evidenced conclusions.

  • Use a range of mathematical skills to perform complex scientific calculations.

Students can:

  • Describe the main functions of the major digestive organs of the body.

  • Refer to the structures in the lungs when describing gas exchange.

  • Explain why different people have different nutritional requirements.

  • Explain how the forces within molecules affect the properties of substances.

  • Determine the number of atoms and elements within a compound.

  • Describe how light can be refracted at plane surfaces.

  • Explain how coloured objects appear when illuminated by coloured lights.

  • Use accurate scientific terminology.

  • Use appropriate mathematical methods accurately.

  • Analyse qualitative and quantitative data to draw plausible conclusions supported by some evidence.

  • Evaluate methodologies to suggest improvements to experimental methods, and comment on scientific conclusions.

 

Students can:

  •  Identify on a diagram the position of the major digestive organs of the body.

  • Describe some differences between inhaled and exhaled air.

  • Recognise particle diagrams of elements, compounds and giant molecules.

  • Use the terms monomer and polymer.

  • Understand that light travels in straight lines.

  • Describe how light is reflected from a plane surface.

  • Describe why refraction happens.

  • Use mostly accurate scientific terminology.

  • Use appropriate mathematical skills. 

  • Students will be able to analyse qualitative or quantitative data and make a conclusion.  

  • Identify errors relating to experimental methods.

 

Technology

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Identify and select all the correct tools, equipment and components needed to solder a circuit.

  • Demonstrate using a few new practical skills with some accuracy.

  • Use tools and equipment safely.

  • Use CAD to produce three different designs that all would be viable to be manufactured using CAM and have used different processes.

  • Produce a detailed analysis of existing products with independent research taken place.

  • Produce a detailed design specification covering all points in response to a design brief with good justification.

  • Produce a range of different detailed design ideas; rendered with annotations.

 

Pupils can:

  • Identify and select the correct tools, equipment and components needed to solder a circuit.

  • Demonstrate using new practical skills with some accuracy.

  • Use tools and equipment safely

  • Use CAD to produce three different designs that all would be viable to be manufactured using CAM.

  • Produce a detailed analysis of two products with all answers well justified with several reasons and more headings introduced.

  • Produce a design specification covering most points in response to a design brief with good justification.

  • Produce a range of design ideas; rendered with annotations.

Pupils can:

  • Identify and select all the correct tools and equipment needed to manufacture the product.

  • Demonstrate practical skills prior practical skills with some accuracy.

  • Use tools and equipment safely.

  • Use CAD to produce 3 designs that all would be viable to be manufactured using CAM.

  • Produce an analysis of two products with all answers well justified with several reasons.

  • Produce a design specification covering most points in response to a design brief with some justification.

  • Produce range of design ideas, some rendering with some annotations.