Year 8 Subject Progress Grids - AP1

Art

Band A

Band B

Band C

Competent and consistent critical understanding of the work of Henry Moore. Competent ability to select and experiment with media, materials, techniques and processes appropriate to personal intentions.

  • Competent analysis of the work of the Henry Moore, use of keywords.

  • Figurative drawings completed with consistent proportions to the human figure. 

  • Completion of a 3D Clay sculpture, with a resemblance to a Figurative image in the style of Henry Moore.

Basic critical understanding of the work of Henry Moore. Basic ability to select and experiment with media, materials, techniques and processes appropriate to personal intentions.

  • Emerging and competent analysis of the work of other artists, some use of keywords.

  • Figurative drawings completed with inconsistent proportions. 

  • Completion of a 3D clay sculpture, with some resemblance to a figurative image.

Basic critical understanding of the work of Henry Moore.  Limited ability to select and experiment with media, materials, techniques and processes appropriate to personal intentions.

  • Basic analysis of the work of Henry Moore, with no keywords used.

  • Figurative drawings completed with incorrect proportions.

  • Completion of a 3D clay sculpture, loosely resembling a figurative image.

 

 

Drama

Band A

Band B

Band C

 Students can:

  • Demonstrate some reasonable insight and sensitivity in working in a group to produce a performance.

  • Demonstrate an awareness of the relationship between texts and dramatic styles.

  • Recall, select and communicate reasonable knowledge and understanding of plays and other types of drama.

  • Apply and adapt a reasonable range of practical skills.

  • Perform a role with some creativity and originality to communicate ideas. This is consistent in performance.

  • Have reasonable communicative and reflective skills.

  • Show a reasonable understanding of drama terminology and use it mostly accurately and appropriately.

  • Mostly show a reasonable critical awareness of work in progress in terms of design, their own contribution and that of others.

  • Show a reasonable awareness of the audience.

  • Work well in the group and respond to the leadership of others.

Students can:

  • Demonstrate some limited insight and sensitivity in working in a group to produce a performance.

  • Demonstrate some limited awareness of the relationships between texts and dramatic styles.

  • Recall, select and communicate some knowledge and understanding of plays and other types of drama.

  • Apply a limited range of practical skills to some effect.

  • Perform a simple role to communicate ideas usually effectively.

  • Demonstrate some straightforward communicative and reflective skills.

  • Show some limited understanding of drama terminology and use it with accuracy.

  • Show some limited awareness of the audience and provide some support to the group.

Students can:

  • Work in a group to produce a performance at a basic level.

  • Demonstrate a basic awareness of the relationship between texts and dramatic styles. 

  • Recall, select and communicate some basic understanding of plays and other types of drama.

  • Apply basic practical skills.

  • Perform a role at a basic level to communicate their ideas.

  • Demonstrate basic communicative and reflective skills.

  • Show a basic understanding of drama terminology and can use it generally.

  • Comment on their own and others work giving some positives and some ways to improve.

  • Show a basic awareness of the audience, and a basic commitment to the group is evident.

 

English

Band A

Band B

Band C

Reading 
Reading
Reading

Students can:

  • Evaluate and analyse the texts studied  with accuracy and sustained understanding.

  • Understand and make detailed responses to the  explicit and implicit meanings and viewpoints within  a variety of texts with differing purpose, audience and form.

  • Analyse and evaluate various aspects of language, grammar and structure.

  • Support their personal response with precise embedded references to texts and the context of the era in which they were written.

Students can:

  • Confidently describe and summarise the texts studied with accuracy and clear understanding.

  • Respond with increasing accuracy to most explicit and some implicit information and viewpoints  within a variety of texts with differing purpose, audience and form

  • Make relevant comments about a writer’s use of  language and structure 

  • Support their comments and opinions with quotations from the text with some reference to the era and context in which they were written.

 

Students can:

  • Make some straightforward points about the various texts studied using some limited detail and evidence. 

  • Respond to individual words in an extract  and make some attempt to explain their effect on the reader.

  • Develop a limited personal response to the texts studied.

 

Writing
writing
writing

Students can:

  • Communicate with increasing confidence and clarity the purpose, audience and form of their writing in both non-fiction and fictional tasks.

  • Produce engaging, developed extended writing with conscious shape and cohesion.

  • Use a variety of sentence types and structures and increasingly sophisticated vocabulary that is selected for effect. 

  • Spell, punctuate and use grammar accurately, with few errors.

 

Students can:

  •  Communicate ideas with increasing success to produce writing in both non fiction and fictional forms

  • Produce structurally sound writing with an increasing awareness of purpose 

  • Show control over sentence type and structure and use some sophisticated vocabulary to some effect 

  • Spell, punctuate and use grammar with increased accuracy.

Students can:

  • Communicate with some increased detail. 

  • Attempt to use  some increased structural features within their writing

  • Try to use a range of sentence types with some simple vocabulary 

  • Make some increased attempt to spell accurately and punctuate writing.

 

Ethics

BAND A

BAND B

BAND C

Students can:

  •  Can analyse and draw comparisons between the meaning behind Jewish and Hindu ways of life.

  • Reflect on their own religious responses in comparison to the beliefs of Judaism and Hinduism.

  • Evaluate how the Ten Commandments and the Puja and Varnas impact upon every day decisions.

Students can:

  • Explain the meaning behind both Jewish and Hindu ways of life.

  • Evaluate their own religious responses in comparison to the beliefs of Judaism and Hinduism.

  • Compare the forms of expression from Judaism and Hinduism.

Students can:

  •  Describe the meaning behind both Jewish and Hindu ways of life. 

  • Identify some similarities and differences between Judaism and Hinduism.

  • Consider their own religious ideas in comparison to the beliefs of Judaism, or Hinduism.

 

Food and nutrition

Band A

Band B

Band C

Safe hygienic working and skilled production of dishes:
Safe hygienic working and skilled production of dishes:
Safe hygienic working and skilled production of dishes:

Students can:

  • Explain what constitutes healthy meal choices and have a developing knowledge of ingredients.

  • Describe the function of key nutrients, their purpose in the diet and give examples of food sources. They also have a good understanding of what forms a balanced diet and how this is achieved around the world. 

  • Identify key ingredients from different countries and know that foods change from place to place according to climate and culture.

 

Students can:

  • Describe what makes a healthy meal choice and have a developing knowledge of ingredients.

  • Describe functions of key nutrients, their purpose in the diet and give some examples of food sources. 

  • Describe what constitutes a balanced diet and how this is achieved around the world by eating different foods. 

  • Identify key ingredients from different countries and know that foods change from place to place according to climate and culture.

 

Students can:

  • State healthy meal choices and have a developing knowledge of ingredients.

  • State some functions of key nutrients, their purpose in the diet and give an example of a food source or two. 

  • Describe what constitutes a balanced diet with some examples.

  • Identify some ingredients from different countries and realise that foods change from place to place according to climate and culture.

 

 

 

Geography

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of a variety of places, environments

  • Demonstrate detailed understanding of human and physical processes

  • Explain in various ways in which places are linked and the impacts that have on people and environments

  • Make judgements and draw conclusions about geographical issues and problems

  • Demonstrate a detailed understanding of issues such as desertification and sustainability and have a secure understanding of the impacts on people and the environment.

  • Evaluate strategies to reduce desertification or population growth, beginning to consider sustainability

  •  Begin to make  connections to wider geographical study 

  • Independently use a range of data to construct graphs and interpret these (climate graph, population pyramid) with reference to evidence 

  • Use a wide range of geographical words appropriately.

Students can:

  • Demonstrate clear knowledge of places, specific features of environments

  • Show increasing understanding of how processes can change places, features and environments in different ways

  • Demonstrate clear understanding of human and physical conditions and processes

  • Demonstrate understanding of issues such as desertification/population increase  and show understanding of the impacts on people and environment. 

  • Evaluate strategies to reduce desertification or population growth

  • Use a range of data to construct graphs and interpret these (climate graph, population pyramid)

  • Communicate opinions in a way appropriate to the audience with justification 

  • Use geographical words with reasonable accuracy.

Students can:

 

  • Demonstrate some knowledge  of places including physical and human features and places

  • Show some understanding how and why they are similar or different and why they are changing

  • Demonstrate some understanding of human and physical processes 

  • Demonstrate some understanding of issues such as desertification/population increase and show understanding of the impacts on people and environment

  • Students show some  understanding of strategies to reduce desertification or strategies how to reduce population growth

  • With support, use a range of data to construct graphs and interpret these (climate graph, population pyramid)

  • Communicate opinions in a way appropriate to the audience 

  • Use simple geographical vocabulary.

 

 

History

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Demonstrate detailed knowledge and understanding of the learnt period and start to make link with national/international history

  • Select, organise and use relevant information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to produce well-structured work The answer may explores many different reasons (E.g: why Henry VIII break with Rome- economic, political, religious and personal reasons)

  • Investigate historical problems and issues, asking and refining their own questions and beginning to reflect on the process undertaken

  • Explain how and why different interpretations of the past have arisen

  • Explain how the significance of events , people and changes have varied according to historical perspectives.

Students can:

  • Demonstrate a more secure knowledge and understanding of the learnt period (has a more secure chronological understanding how each king/queen followed)

  • Select, organise and deploy relevant information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to produce structured work eg. succession, political cause, Reformation, money, Martin Luther

  • Demonstrate that their  answers has clear paragraphs but they may lack detail or explanation is not always complete

  • Begin to analyse the nature and extent of diversity, change and continuity within and across different periods. They begin to explain relationships between causes (such as they make link between different causes on why Henry created his new church)

  • Investigate historical problems and issues and begin to refine their own questions 

  • Begin to explain how and why different interpretations of the past have arisen.

Students can:

  • Show that they are approaching to a more detailed knowledge and understanding of the learnt period (aware of some of the Tudor/Stuart king/queens and recall some events such as Wars of Roses or Civil War)

  • Select and deploy information and make appropriate use of historical terminology to support and structure their work eg. religion, Africans, leader, heir, Catherine of Aragon, Henry VIII

  • Start describing events, people and some features of past societies and periods in the context of their developing chronological framework 

  • Start investigating historical problems such as treatment of Black Africans and begin to ask their own questions  

  • Start suggesting a reason for different interpretations of the past and they start to begin recognising why some events, people and changes might be judged as more historically significant than others.

 

 

Languages

Band A

Band B

Band C

French 
French 
french

Students can:

  •  Attain high scores on SSC vocab tests (English to Target Language).  

  • Demonstrate understanding of opinions and reasons in Reading Comprehension.  

  • Translate short passages accurately from the Target Language.  

  • Write a short paragraph fairly accurately in Target Language  expressing clear opinions with simple reasons.

Students can:

  • Attain high scores on SC vocab tests ( half Target Language to  English & half English to Target Language).

  • Demonstrate understanding of opinions and main points in Reading Comprehension.

  • Translate short phrases accurately from the Target Language.

  • Write a few short sentences/phrases in Target Language which express simple opinions clearly, if not totally accurately.

Students can:

  •  Attain high scores on Challenge vocab tests (Target Language to English).

  • Demonstrate understanding of opinions, key vocab, and some short phrases in Reading Comprehension. 

  • They can write key words and phrases in Target Language from memory. Spellings may not be totally accurate.

 

Spanish 
Spanish 
Spanish 

Students can:

  •  Attain high scores on SSC vocab tests (English to Target Language).  

  • Demonstrate understanding of opinions and reasons in Reading Comprehension.  

  • Translate short passages accurately from the Target Language.  

  • Write a short paragraph fairly accurately in Target Language  expressing clear opinions with simple reasons and alluding to other timeframes as well as the present tense.

 Students can:

  •  Attain high scores on SC vocab tests ( half Target Language to  English & half English to Target Language).

  • Demonstrate understanding of opinions and main points in Reading Comprehension.

  • Translate words and short phrases accurately from the Target Language.

  • Write a few short sentences/phrases in Target Language which express simply opinions clearly, if not totally accurately.

 Students can:

  •  Attain high scores on Challenge vocab tests (Target Language to English).

  • Demonstrate understanding of opinions, familiar words, and some short phrases in Reading Comprehension.

  • They can write some words in Target Language from memory. Spellings may not be totally accurate.

 

Maths

Band A

Band B

Band C

In addition to the requirements for Band B and C, students can:

  • Understand the difference between a prime number and composite number.

  • Use prime factorisation to solve problems with highest common factor and lowest common multiple.

  • Solve problems involving standard form.

  • Solve problems with standard form using a scientific calculator.

  • Subtract a negative number from any number.

  • Divide a negative number by another negative number.

  • Use Cube numbers both positive and negative.

  • Use a scientific calculator with fractions.

  • Understand the order of operations (BIDMAS) including the square roots.

  • Find the centre of enlargement and the scale factor.

  • Solve problems on scaled diagrams and maps.

  • Interpret plans and elevations, and draw a 3-D shape from them with correct dimensions (both annotated or to scale).

  • Solve contextualised problems with bearings.

  • Solve geometric problems with bearings.

 

In addition to the requirements for Band C, students can:

  • Write any Integer <1000 as a product of prime numbers.

  • Use prime factorising to find the highest common factor and lowest common multiple of two numbers.

  • Round any numbers to any given number of significant figures.

  • Use standard form to write small and large numbers.

  • Explore ways to enter standard form on a scientific calculator.

  • Subtract a positive number from a negative number.

  • Add a negative number to any number.

  • Multiply two negative numbers together.

  • Divide a negative integer by a positive integer.

  • Square positive and negative integers.

  • Understand the order of operations including powers (BIDMAS). 

  • Understand and use a centre of enlargement.

  • Use the concept of scale in diagrams.

  • Draw the plans and elevations of more complicated compound shapes.

  • Use the correct notation for bearings and calculate with them using correct scales.

Students can: 

  • Find the prime factors of a number.

  • Round any numbers to 2 significant figures.

  • Subtract a large positive integer from a smaller positive integer.

  • Add a positive number to a negative number.

  • Multiply a positive number with a negative number.

  • Divide a positive integer by a negative integer.

  • Use a scientific calculator to calculate with negative numbers.

  • Enlarge a shape by a positive integer scale factor.

  • Understand what the scale means on maps and diagrams.

  • Know the plans and elevations for 2-D drawings.

  • Understand bearings and be able to measure them.

 

Music

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Play all of the right hand part of Fur Elise, and are beginning to add the left hand too.

  • Identify treble clef notes on the stave.

  • Describe how the elements of music are used to create different moods when listening.

 

Students can:

  • Play the opening three phases of Fur Elise.

  • Identify all the white and black notes on the piano, and are beginning to read notation with support.

  • Can identify all of the musical elements from listening.

 

Students can:

  • Play the opening notes of Fur Elise using just the right hand.

  • Identify all the white notes on the piano.

  • Describe the dynamics (volume) and tempo (speed) of music from listening.

 

PCE

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Evaluate the characteristics of good and safe decision making.

  • Demonstrate good knowledge that  enables informed decisions about their own and others’ risk taking choices.

  • Confidently advise others with their risk taking choices and decision making.

  • Always demonstrate positive social skills, taking into account personal circumstances when considering others' choices.

  • Work very well as part of a team and demonstrate leadership qualities, often influencing others in a positive way.

Students can:

  • Explain the characteristics of good and safe decision making.

  • Demonstrate good knowledge that enables informed decisions about their own risk taking choices.

  • Sometimes advise others with their risk taking choices and decision making.

  • Demonstrate positive social skills which allows an understanding of other people’s choices.

  • Work well as part of a team, often influencing others in a positive way.

Students can:

  • Describe the characteristics of good and safe decision making.

  • Demonstrate a basic knowledge that enables informed decisions about own risk taking choices.

  • Mostly demonstrate positive social skills, allowing some understanding of other people’s decision making.

  • Work well as part of a team, sometimes influencing others in a positive way.

 

PE

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Give a detailed definition of the fitness components and confidently link to a variety of  relevant sporting examples. 

  • Explain the relevance of fitness testing and its importance for improving performance across a variety of sports.

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge of how to conduct fitness tests accurately and be able to identify strengths and weaknesses in their own and others’ performance. 

  • Confidently lead others through the performance of each fitness test.

  • Describe and conduct the relevant training methods for the fitness component and make clear links to practical examples.

  • Compare their current fitness levels to others in the class and identify areas to improve their own and others’ performance.

Students can:

  • Give a detailed definition of the fitness components and give a link to a relevant sporting examples. 

  • Explain the relevance of fitness testing and its importance for improving performance.

  • Demonstrate a sound knowledge of how to conduct fitness tests accurately and be able to identify strengths and weaknesses in their own and others’ performance.

  • Describe and conduct the relevant training methods for the fitness component and make clear links to practical examples.

  • Compare their current fitness levels to others in the class and identify areas to improve their own and others’ performance.

 

Students can:

  • Give a basic definition of the fitness components and give a link to a relevant sporting example.  

  • Describe the relevance of fitness testing and its importance for improving performance.

  • Demonstrate a reasonable knowledge of how to conduct fitness tests accurately and be able to identify strengths and weaknesses in performance.

  • Identify the relevant training methods for the fitness component and make some links to practical examples.

  • Give a basic comparison of their current fitness levels to others in the class.

 

 

Science

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Use the function of the parts of the reproductive system to explain why some people may have trouble conceiving.

  • Describe food teats and explain the limitations of these tests.

  • Describe some adaptations of the digestive system.

  • Write balanced symbol equations for the reactions of acids with metals, carbonates and non-metal oxides.

  • Apply and rearrange the equation W = m x g

  • Explain the effects of changing gravity.

  • Describe the patterns in electrical current in both series and parallel circuits.

Students can:

  • Describe the function of named parts of the human reproductive system.

  • Describe how to test for nutrients by conducting food tests.

  • Describe diseases caused by vitamin deficiencies.

  • Describe the function of named parts of the digestive system.

  • Write word and symbol equations for the reactions of acids with metals, carbonates and non-metal oxides.

  • Define weight and explain why weight can change.

  • Recall and apply the equation  W = m x g

  • Describe why the size of the force of gravity can change.

  • Describe electrical current.

 

Students can:

  • Name parts of the human reproductive system.

  • Name all of the nutrients in a balanced diet.

  • Identify the changes that occur in food tests.

  • Describe what a vitamin deficiency is.

  • Label parts of the digestive system.

  • Write word equations for the reactions of acids with metals, carbonates and non-metal oxides.

  • Define weight.

  • Use the equation W = m x g

  • Name two factors that affect the size of the force of gravity.

  • Identify series and parallel circuits.

  • Describe the equipment needed to measure electrical current.

 

Technology

Band A

Band B

Band C

Students can:

  • Confidently assemble a practical piece using a range of materials and processes, which shows accuracy and dexterity and utilises a range of techniques and tools and skills. 

  • Using a basic brief which identifies a range of target markets, develop and adapt a variety of graphic elements for their designs, which are appropriate for the process and demonstrate an understanding of the outcome.

  • Confidently and safely use a soldering iron to produce a working circuit and have a firm understanding of basic electronics.

Students can:

  • Assemble a practical piece using a range of materials and processes, which shows dexterity and utilises a range of techniques and tools.

  • Use a basic brief which identifies a range of target markets, develop some graphic elements which are appropriate for the process and demonstrate an understanding of the outcome. 

  • Safely use a soldering iron to produce a working circuit and have some understanding of basic electronics.

Students can:

  • Assemble a practical piece using a range of materials and processes, which shows some skill and use of some tools.

  • Develop an image which is appropriate for the brief and has some understanding of the process.

  • Safely use a soldering iron to produce a working circuit which has all the basic electronics.